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Full text of "The Design response : an exhibition"

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From the Committee . . . 



From the President . . 



Most of you are familiar with the 
"Design Necessity" and the 
"Design Reality." But what is "The 
Design Response" and who is 
responsible for it? 

"The Design Response" is a 
portfolio of the finest in Federal 
design work produced by 
designers working in or for the 
Federal government across the 
country. It is the designer's 
response to the President's 
Federal Design Improvement 
Program. This portfolio exhibits the 
design work of over half of all 
Federal agencies and illustrates 
the expanding base of excellence 
in Federal design. 

"The Design Response" is 
produced by the Federal Design 
Council, a professional group of 
designers and design adminis- 
trators committed to excellence in 
Federal design. In particular, it is a 
product of the exhibition 
committee members, Charles 
Gailis, Bill Caldwell, David Sutton, 
and the Executive Board of the 
Federal Design Council. 

We encourage your comments 
and reactions to "The Design 
Response." Please write: 
The Exhibition Committee of the 
Federal Design Council, 
P.O. Box 7537, Washington, D. C 
20044. 



"XWRi 



RAAAWw^K_ 



David Hausmann 
Exhibition Chairman 



"The Design Response" is the first 
major exhibition of Federal 
graphics, audio-visuals, architec- 
ture and interiors organized on a 
national scale. The exhibit 
represents an unparalleled range 
of creativitv and diversity in 
design efforts throughout the 
Federal government. Standards of 
design excellence for today and 
the future are presented here. 

"The Design Response" has 
been organized and presented by 
the Federal Design Council, a 
professional society of govern- 
ment designers. The purpose of 
the Council is to promote the 
status of the designer and the 
quality of design work produced. 
This exciting exhibition is a 
strong reflection of the Council's 
many activities aimed at achieving 
that purpose. Both the National 
Endowment for the Arts, a primary 
sponsor of Federal design 
improvement and the Government 
Printing Office have enthusiastic- 
ally supported the concept of 
the show. 

The concept of the designer 
working for the Federal govern- 
ment is not new. Throughout its 
200 year history the Government 
has actively hired designers and 
utilized design services of all 
kinds. Maps, stamps, money, 
certificates, posters, publications, 
buildings, monuments, interiors, 
national parks and the ubiquitous 
form to be filled out are some of 
the things produced which 
communicate directlv or indirectly 
our Government's relationship to 
"We the people." Many of these 
stand out in our minds because 
of the design and artistic qualities 
which went into their creation. 
Who can forget, for example, 
James Montgomery Flagg's 
"Uncle Sam Wants You" poster, 
or more recently Robert Indiana's 
"LOVE" stamp. 

Today the Federal government 
spends large amounts of money 
for design services to communi- 
cate— to respond - in many ways 
to its citizens. These communica- 
tions at their best are designed to 
be as clear, direct, and visually 
appealing as possible. "The 
Design Response" combines the 
agency's requirements with the 
designer's skills to produce the 
vital communication link to the 
public. Such response must be not 
only effective in reaching the 



audience but also in representing 
the agency in a professional 
manner. It must be clear that the 
agency has concern that both the 
communication and the public 
audience are of utmost importance. 
The emphasis on design quality 
has been promoted within 
government for several years by 
the National Endowment for the 
Arts. Its Federal Graphics Improve- 
ment Program is working con- 
tinuously with government 
agencies to develop means for 
improving the quality of design in 
all its aspects. The assumption 
of the Endowment and the Federal 
Design Council is that high quality 
design, with all its considered 
ramifications for audience, content, 
goals, and agency, can be the 
most efficient and productive 
means for improving design 
effectiveness. 

How "The Design Response" 
Developed 

A call for entries was issued 
inviting submissions of design 
work created for the Federal 
government. The response to that 
call, almost 1 ,000 entries, poured 
in from all over the country. Each 
entrant was asked to include the 
design rationale used to develop 
the design solution entered. 
Several of these explanations have 
been included in the show to give 
you, the viewer, a fuller sense of 
why the entry was designed in a 
particular way for the agency. 

The judges, Karl Fink, Tom 
Coleman, Richard Hess, and 
George Nelson were selected to 
assure both balanced design 
expertise and team effectiveness. 
The judging process took two 
days during which the judges 
applied themselves well to the 
arduous task of sorting and 
selecting We owe much to their 
sense of professional dedication. 
Workinq as a dynamic team- 
sometimes agreeing, other times 
disagreeing volubly— each 
showed a clear respect for the 
other's reasoning In all cases they 
reached a consensus opinion to 
declare an item in or out of 
the show. 

Each piece was chosen with the 
utmost attention to current 
professional standards of visual 
quality and communication 
problem solving. At the conclusion 
of the process 143 items were 



given a place in the show as 
representing the best standards 
of the designer's art. 

We of the Federal Design 
Council hope that you not only 
enjoy this show but also that you 
consider your own response to 
"The Design Response." 

Some Observations for 
the Future 

In the process of putting this show 
together several ideas crystal ized 
which are worth highlighting. 

It is evident that there should 
be more collaboration, more 
informal exchange of ideas, among 
government designers in the 
many agencies of Washington and 
across the country. The wealth 
of good work going on should have 
more of an influence on us all. 
Likewise there should be more 
interchange of ideas with the 
commercial designers. The gov- 
ernment designer has tended to 
lead a rather isolated life in times 
past- isolated from his colleagues 
in the government and from the 
larger professional design 
community. The stimulating 
influence of new ideas cannot help 
but have a growth impact on our 
day-to-day work. This exchange 
can be considered as an informal 
approach to education. 

The more formal methods 
suggested by Tom Coleman (see 
the Judging section) can be more 
systematic in ensuring professional 
development for the individual 
and the design group of an 
agency. The National Endowment 
and the Government Printing 
Office have begun efforts in this 
direction. The Federal Design 
Council, as part of its ongoing 
commitment to its membership, 
holds periodic professional 
seminars. Together we can help 
each other in molding a continuing 
pattern of growth in the design 
state-of-the-art for government. 

There are definite areas of 
design missing from the show. 
This was evident in the entries 
submitted. As a result, a major 
focus of this show is on the 
external communications of an 
agency and its public. Dick Hess 
mentioned some of the show 
deficiencies in this area. Of equal 
importance are the internal items 
and the general working environ- 
ment of the government worker. 
These also require top notch 



visual design to optimize the 
feeling of personal importance 
and to help maximize productivity. 
This goal is an important com- 
ponent of the Presidential 
mandate for full participation by 
the Federal government agencies 
in the arts as exemplified through 
the Federal Graphics improvement 
Program of the National Endow- 
ment. Thus, future shows such as 
"The Design Response" should 
include such items as forms, 
memos and technical manuals. 
Additional entries of interior and 
architectural design should also 
be included. 

Further, emphasis must be 
placed on solutions which achieve 
the best in aesthetic and commu- 
nication effectiveness for the most 
reasonable cost. For example, a 
specially designed typewritten 
format can invite reading and be 
more readable than the usual 
fill-up-the-page typing found in the 
piles of documents seen on every 
office desk. (How much really gets 
read now?) Other ideas to 
encourage efficiency in the flow 
of information internally and 
externally need to be explored 
and encouraged — no matter how 
large or small. There is much 
competition today for our attention 
and time. Effective visual design 
at all levels is the vital force in 
all kinds of communication. 

The means by which an agency 
presents and identifies itself to its 
audiences is a concern which 
needs much exploration. Basic 
assumptions, thus far, have been 
that the corporate or more 
standardized identity approach be 
adopted for agencies. This hints 
at another idea suggested by 
some that the Canadian govern- 
ment's concept of an identity 
program be adopted. Important 
questions fol low these suggestions. 
If an agency is unlike a corpora- 
tion in significant ways, as 
mentioned by Karl Fink, can we 
automatically assume the validity 
of the standardized identity idea 
without fully examining all the 
implications? If we choose to 
create a Federal government 
identity program, are we at the 
same time creating a monolithic 
image of big government? Since 
agencies do vary in size and 
function and do have differing 
segments of the population as 
audiences, is it not more appro- 



priate to reflect the individual 
character of the institution on a 
more human level? 

Then there is the concept of 
audience feedback. How do we 
know whether our audience is 
seeing and responding as we 
intended 9 How do we determine 
our communication effectiveness, 
when we do not have the normal 
measure of sales results? What do 
we really know about the re- 
sponse of the audience to our 
message designs 7 

To those who made it possible 

Much time and effort have gone 
into "The Design Response." I 
want to thank the many people 
who gave their time and talents to 
make it the outstanding reality 
that it is. Thanks go to the show 
committee, effectively chaired by 
David Hausmann and ably sup- 
ported by Chuck Gailis, Bill 
Caldwell and David Sutton, as well 
as to the Federal Design Council 
executive board. Special thanks 
go to the many members of the 
government design community 
without whose tireless help we 
could not have implemented the 
many steps necessary to achieve 
completion. Also, I want to 
acknowledge the very willing 
support and encouragement of the 
National Endowment for the Arts 
and the Government Printing 
Office. It is my hope that the 
patterns of cooperation and 
exchange that have grown out of 
this effort will continue. It is 
certainly the intent of the Federal 
Design Council to make every 
effort in that direction. Work with 
us and we will help make it 
happen. 



Mack R. Rowe 
Federal Design Council 



The Judges 



George Nelson 



George Nelson, designer, teacher 
and writer, was trained as an 
architect. At the end of his pro- 
fessional schooling at Yale, 
Nelson won a national competi- 
tion for the Rome Prize in 
Architecture and spent two years 
of study in Italy. One by-product 
was the first series of articles in 
the U. S. on the work of the pio- 
neering modern architects of 
Europe. These brought him an 
invitation to join the Architectural 
Forum; he later became the mag- 
azine's co-managing editor. This 
followed by editorial work on 
Fortune and a new magazine 
project for Time-Life. 

In 1942 he developed the 
"Grass on Main Street'' concept 
which became the now-familiar 
pedestrian mall. The following 
year the Storagewall was created 
and has since been widely used 
in dwellings and offices. His first 
office furniture, designed for 
Herman Miller in 1946, remains 
an industry standard. The Bubble 
Lamp, a translucent self-webbing 
plastic on a wire frame, made 
possible inexpensive lamps of 
complex shape. His office has 
designed products, graphics, of- 
fice interiors, shops, restaurants, 
exhibitions; it was responsible 
for the design of the U. S. National 
Exhibition in Moscow, 1959, the 
first major American exhibition 
under the U.S./U.S.S.R. Cultural 
Exchange Agreement. 

Nelson is the author of numer- 
ous articles published in this 
country and abroad. His classic 
book "Problems of Design" has 
been translated into Japanese 
and Russian. He has acted as 
Visiting Critic in Architecture 
at the Graduate School of Design 
at Harvard University and lec- 
tured at many universities and 
consultant to others. 

He is a fellow of: the American 
Institute of Architects; the Indus- 
trial Designers Society of America; 
of the Royal Society of Arts 
(London); and of the American 
Academy in Rome. He has re- 
ceived the Industrial Arts Medal 
from the AIA, a Distinguished 
Award for his Contribution to the 
Profession of Design from the 
ISDA; and the Elsie de Wolfe 
Award from the ASID. 

George Nelson is president of 
the company that bears his name 




Karl Fink 



Karl Fink, currently in his 
second term as president of the 
American Institute of Graphic 
Arts, heads the design office 
bearing his name. A graduate of 
Parsons School of Design, Mr. 
Fink established Karl Fink and 
Associates in 1951 to render 
graphic and industrial design 
services to clients in such in- 
dustries as cosmetics, pharma- 
ceutical, fragrance, tobacco, 
confectionery, periodical and 
book publishing. He was presi- 
dent of the Package Designers 
Council, member of the profes- 
sional council of the Packaging 
Institute and of the Board of 
Directors of the Inter-Society 
Color Council. 

Mr. Fink has been a teacher, 
lecturer, seminar panelist, mod- 
erator in areas of design. He has 
chaired, planned or served on 
the juries of numerous exhibi- 
tions and competitions in graphic 
and industrial design. He is the 
author of introductory texts for 
some of the Graphics Press 
books, and a frequent contributor 
to professional journals. 




Richard Hess 



Richard Hess, who was born in 
Royal Oak, Mich., in 1934, is a self- 
taught artist who has risen 
rapidly to the ranks of America's 
leading illustrators. After art 
directorships for some years with 
five of the best-known U. S. 
advertising agencies, Hess formed 
Richard Hess, Inc. in 1965 and 
quickly established itself as one 
of the most distinguished studios 
in New York. In addition to 
servicing networks, record 
companies, publishers and 
several corporate giants, Hess 
took over Vista, a magazine pub- 
lished by the United Nations 
Association. Under his art direction 
Vista became one of the most 
prestigious publications in design 
circles. He continues to run his 
design studio, creating trademarks, 
annual reports and packaging. 
His illustrations are collectors' 
items and he is currently one of 
the most sought-after illustrators in 
the United States. Hess is the 
recipient of many awards, the most 
recent being two gold and two 
silver medals from the New York 
Art Directors Show. He is an active 
member of the American Institute 
of Graphic Arts, a frequent speaker 
at symposiums and at universities, 
and recently took the first steps 
towards organizing illustrators into 
a guild. 




Tom Coleman 



Tom Coleman, currently Associate 
Professor of Graphic Design at 
Indiana University, has spent the 
past year on leave of absence to 
act as liason officer and program 
action officer for the National 
Endowment for the Arts and the 
Civil Service Commission on the 
"Excellence Attracts Excellence" 
program. He has an exceptional 
educational and design back- 
ground, and has received a 
number of awards. His degrees 
include a MFA from Yale 
University and a BFA from 
Minneapolis. He has served as 
designer or art director for IBM, 
General Motors Styling Staff, New 
Haven City Planning Commission 
and the Yale University Press. His 
work has appeared in Art 
Direction, Print, Graphis, 
Industrial Design, Communication 
Arts, Architectual Record, Inter- 
national Poster Annual, Trademarks 
and Symbols among others. 




Federal Design Council 
Executive Board 



The Design Response 
Committee 






President: Mack Rowe 

First Vice President: David Hausmann 

Second Vice President: Lorna Shanks / Betty Moran 

Secretary: B. R. Contreras 

Treasurer: Minge Frye 



Chairman: David Hausmann 
Goalie: Charles Gailis 

Catalogue: Bill Caldwell 
Printer: Stephenson Lithograph, Inc. 
Typesetter: General Typographers, Inc. 
Paper: Stanford Paper Co. 

Exhibit: David Sutton 
Exhibit system: Container Corporation 
Facilities: U. S. Department of Labor 
Photographer: Frederick Figall 

Assistants: 
George Baka 
Michelle Bellavance 
Linda Brown 
Steve Ferretti 
Helen Gebhardt 
Frances Gill 
Christine Griffith 
Cynthia Guin 
Elaine Hamilton 
Betty Hebb 
William Howard 
Barry Huber 
Jeanne Krohn 
Dale Pavey 
Geri Pavey 
Jerry Pavey 
Terri Plumb 
Cyndi Stana 
Janet Thot 
Ronald Winterrowd 
Turk Winterrowd 



The Judging Process 



Some interesting comments were 
exchanged throughout the judging 
process, and a selection of these 
comments is provided here to 
give some flavor of what went on. 

Government Identity 

Fink: "I'd like to see some inquiry 
into government identity. How 
agencies should differ from each 
other. Or should they? What 
relationship they should have with 
each other. We're all pretty tired 
of the eagle. Stars are beginning 
to bother us; so are stripes. This 
problem merits your attention. 
It merits the calling in of others 
besides graphic designers- 
people like Arnheim, the visual 
psychologist— people who under- 
stand reactions to visible phe- 
nomena and what they mean. How 
visual arrays are read — how the 
brain responds to stimuli. It's a 
cinch that we as designers and 
jurors aren't buying much of what 
is being done today in terms 
of design." 

Government Communication 

Hess: "Some of the films seem to 
be propaganda. They present 
policies unsupported by facts." 
Fink: "Yes, I felt I was being 
manipulated. In reading print, 
you're not the captive audience 
that you are with visual media 
such as films, slides, etc. That's a 
very important point. You can't 
pick up a TV program and read it 
or scan it or skip chapters." 
Hess: "Also, you supply your own 
tone of voice in a printed piece." 
Fink: "The government does many 
things and spends great amounts 
of money on its citizens. These 
communications should be in an 
expository style and not presented 
in a manipulative or defensive 
way. Government isn't like industry. 
The problems are different. It's 
not marketing a commodity; it's 
not a public utility. The first 
emphasis is on legibility; not 
marketing. Government should 
inform and make clear. If it's 
necessary for an agency to take a 
particular position in order to 
solve a problem, I think they 
should say so and not present it as 
though it's the only way to look 
at the subject." 
Hess: "Some of the films are 
beautifully done, but I can't include 
them in the show because of the 




total effect of the piece. They 
don't present the case fairly." 
Nelson: "Yes, I'm allergic to 
presentations that try to dazzle 
you so that you never look beyond 
the dazzle." 

Fink: "It's impossible to separate 
content from design. You can't 
underwrite something just because 
it is well done. Even if it's inven- 
tive and entertaining, it's very hard 
to buy it if it's selling something 
that you feel shouldn't be sold or 
that it is definitely trying to 
manipulate. 

Coleman: "How do you think the 
photographers and designers who 
worked on these things should 
feel? Or should they care?" 
Fink: "In advertising there are 
people who won't work on projects 
or products they oppose." 
Hess: "This has changed. It's now 
a business like any other." 
Fink: "There are still artists who 
will not work on things they feel 
are not good for this world " 

Design and the Designer 

Nelson: "We keep wondering why 
people don't get excited about 



'good design' and don't differen- - 
tiate it from "kitsch." It may be 
that there's nothing to excite them. 
I've been taking pictures of some 
of these clusters of buildings 
around, and there's nothing that 
comes within light years of a 
Honda as far as visible quality 
goes. People can look at bikes 
and speakers and really evaluate 
the design quality. It's just possible 
that the public is right. They're 
putting their attention where it 
ought to go— where they feel that 
they have an influence." 
Fink: "It's my observation that 
sophisticated graphic design is 
just beginning to be a state-of-the- 
art in this country." 

Hess: "There doesn't seem to be 
a great interest on the part of the 
government designer in the outside 
world. There's no interchange 
between the New York designer 
and the government designer. 
We need more free-flowing com- 
munic ation between these groups ." 

Hess: "Many New York designers 
see government work as something 
good to be accomplished. This 



is serious stuff. It's not a Gino's 
hamburger problem." 

Hess: "The New York designer 
frequently has the ability to select 
his client— one with whom he 
works easily and well. The inside 
government designer, on the other 
hand, doesn't have this sort of 
option. This situation poses a 
special set of problems in terms 
of achieving good design." 
Coleman: "There are some things 
that can be done to help the 
government designer and design 
-and maybe AIGA can help here 
First, we can encourage young 
designers and student designers 
to go into government design. 
They should want a challenge, an 
opportunity to do something for 
society, a large audience and all 
the work they can handle!" 

"Second, we can develop a 
continuing education program for 
the Federal designer to keep him 
or her refreshed Courses, semi- 
nars, special design speakers, 
lecture series, etc., should be 
widely promoted. Also, hands-on 
studio classes— two to three day 



institutes— involving a university 
or art school teacher with Federal 
and industrial designers can be 
organized around specific sub- 
jects. This is a terrific way to let 
designers know what is going on 
elsewhere. 

"Third, we can encourage the 
exchange of designers between 
government and industry. Send a 
senior designer from industry to 
work with Federal design groups 
for a two-week period on a 
quarterly basis." 
Hess: "We do need to find new 
ways to continue to educate 
ourselves. What has happened 
now in business is that our audi- 
ence has again caught up with us. 
We have bored them to death with 
our stuff. We must find different 
ways to be effective." 

Fink: (on some of the films and 
slides) "There's wastage here that 
is more important than it is in print. 
Much of what we've seen here is 
like the old industrial films-too 
slow paced, too long to get to the 
point. They seem to be using up 
footage, filling up time, because 
that was what was budgeted. They 
should be working from a problem 
definition and not a budget 
definition." 

Hess: "This is what I'm trying to 
change as a designer. Frequently 
I'm told 'I want a 48 page booklet." 
And, if I need 40 or 65 pages, I've 
got a helluva job to squeeze the 
copy or stretch it out. Currently, 
when I take a job- like an annual 
report— I require that we don't 
begin with preconceived notions as 
to how many pages will be used." 

Architecture 

Nelscn: "Much of the work here 
certainly doesn't look like govern- 
ment work of three years ago." 
Fink: "You really have only a token 
amount of entries when compared 
to the other areas. Again, you need 
to make an appeal for a broader 
cross section of entries." 
Hess: "You have some difficulty 
in lumping all segments of desian 
together. Also, I find it difficult to 
judge three-dimensional subjects 
such as exhibits and architecture 
from flat renderings. I once saw 
the renderings for the Edsel, and 
I can see how they got sucked into 
building that ugly thing. The 
drawings looked terrific. By the 
time it got translated through the 




production technology— the 
extrusions, the bending limitations, 
etc.- it had changed." 

Hess: "I find that architects have a 
block when it comes to the 
graphics and signage. They carry 
through the architecture very well. 
And when they come to the interior 
graphic stuff, it breaks down." 

(A discussion ensued in which 
the aspects of architectural design 
and the relationship to its environ- 
ment was explored. One aspect 
was the effectiveness of large 
scale. Huge figures of people and 
objects— such as a gigantic chair 
or a teepee- used as roadside 
advertising was discussed as one 
way to relate to the environment 
and to the public. Oldenburg's 
giant toilet float for the Thames 
River was another. A second 
aspect in the discussion was the 
problem of whether a design 
should contrast with or blend into 
its environment.) 

Nelson: "It's funny about extremely 
large scale. There must be a 
tightrope where somethina is 
funny because of its wit or kooky 
quality, or it's lousy. It's very close. 
The old giant wooden elephant 
in Atlantic City holds pleasant 
memories for me. I don't know 
why." 

"Then, there's the argument that 
says 'OK let's design this 200 
foot diameter ball bearing; some- 
thing that has nothing to do with 
nature.' Suddenly it can look 
absolutely marvelous because this 
is the best there is. And somehow 
it goes together well with its 
environment. Those moon shots; 
that LEM or whatever you call it, 
looks so good there because it 



doesn't touch the landscape. I 
suppose if you had 200,000 LEMs 
all renting for $300 a month . . . 
It's one of the arguments I've 
become aware of as against the 
other one, which is OK too, where 
you say 'Let's make it so incon- 
spicuous that it doesn't bother 
you." 

Logos 

Nelson: (referring to a logo entry) 
"There's nothing wrong with four 
arrows, or three or two, except 
there's a lot of them around." 
Fink: "You could run a whole 
exhibition on arrows today." 
Hess: "Abstract logos have 
become the murmured voice, the 
hubbub. I have a terrible time with 
student work on trademarks. It's 
hard to criticize a perfectly good 
one— except, I'm bored to death 
with it. I don't know that I'd 
notice it." 

Coleman: "I know how to criticize 
it. You say, 'I've seen it'." 
Fink: "With the business of marks 
and logos entered here— almost 
all met with resentment. I don't 
think this reaction is atypical to 
our group." 

Hess: "Logos have met with 
rejection. It's not that there weren't 
some good ones— there were. 
They are not the identity solution 
they once were. Our environment 
is flooded with logos. It's a trend 
that's building faster than anything 
I know. Sometimes identical ones 
get designed simultaneously in 
different parts of the country. 
Simple geometries no longer 
communicate." 

Fink: "You have to stylize images 
into an abstraction today. You don't 





use figurative things in marks." 
Nelson: "They're still holding on 
to that White Rock girl." 
Fink: "It's only a question of time." 
Hess: "Like the Morton Salt girl. 
They take something that's really 
beautiful and change it." 

Printing 

Coleman: "The next time you do 
this show, ask for who the printer 
was. I can't believe the quality on 
some of these pieces. Look at 
these (images in a publication). 
They're supposed to be repros for 
pasting down into camera ready 
art, and there are all different 
shades of grey instead of a 
uniform black." 

Fink: "The printing of some of the 
items was less effective than it 
should've been." 

Hess: "I got a questionnaire a few 
years ago. It said, 'We would like 
to offer better service to designers. 
How can we instruct you in ways 
that will make you better able to 
produce work for printing?' And 
I wrote across the form, 'That's not 
the problem. How can I instruct 
you how to reproduce what we 
produce?' " 

Nelson: "Printing is getting faster, 
but certainly not better. It's a 
curious phenomenon. It doesn't 
show quite as blatantly here as it 
does in other places. We begin to 
get this question: 'How is it that, as 
we get richer and richer and richer, 
supposedly, the quality of this and 



this and this goes down. And 
suddenly there's nothing you can 
afford, whether it's good printing, 
good engraving, or whatever'." 

General Observations 

Nelson: (after seeing the entries 
presented.) "The output of work 
here is prodiqous!" 
Hess: "We are encouraging a 
positive response to the standards 
set here in this show. I was happy 
to see my expectations on the 
graphics entries confirmed. There 
was a general high level of quality 
among the stuff that was very 
good. There's also a lot of 
mediocre stuff. What disturbed me 
most was that I saw a lot of good 
stuff primarily being fluff — like 
posters and bicentennial things. 
Those are all easy. I didn't see any 
of the serious functions like forms. 
Tax return books still aren't 
handling the explaining of the tax 
return problem. You still have to 
be a scholar, with great stamina, 
to read the book which explains 
the form. I expected to see more 
shortcuts for people." 
Hess: "Up until a few years ago, 
I think these shows gave us an 
opportunity to see how the leaders 
of our industry were solving 
problems. They opened up our 
horizons. In the case of this show, 
it will be doing that for the 
government." 



Acknowledgement 



The Federal Design Council 

expresses appreciation to 

the following for their support 

and encouragement: 

The National Endowment for 

the Arts 

The Government Printing 

Office 

U. S. Department of Labor 

Special appreciation is 

extended to the following 

financial sponsors: 

Herman Miller, Inc. 

Container Corporation of 

America 

American Telephone and 

Telegraph 

Radio Corporation of America 



mkw 



eSP 






* 



& ■ 



Abbreviations 

ag. agency 

ad. art director 

ar. architect 

au. author 

cw. copywriter 

de. designer 

di. director 

ed. editor 

ill. illustrator 

id. interior designer 

pe. picture editor 

ph. photographer 

pm. project manager 

pr. producer 

re. renderings 

si. signage 



WJw 



■ 



3$£ 



a I 



ag United Slates Information Agency 
ad Richard Suib 
de William Kissiloff 



ag. United Slates Information Agency 
ad Bill Caldwell/Richard Suib 
de Bill Caldwell/William Kissiloff 




Audience: People of the 
Soviet Union 

To acquaint Soviet visitors to the 
Photography USA Exhibit with 
the why and how of contemporary 
U. S. photography. A magazine 
format is used emphasizing the 
photographs rather than words. 



lag United Slates Information Agency 

id Richard Suib 

de Paul Kervm 

[ph. various 

cw various 









'it* 




■ 
■ 

■ 



■ 




..:■.' 










■ 






■ 



■ 
■ 
■ 



ag American Revolution Bicentennial Administration 
ad Jack Masey 
de Charles Eames 




ag. United Slates Information Agency 

di Charles H Clarke 

ar Robert P. Gersin Assoc 

de Ethel K. Freid 




United Stales exhibition 



OCEAN EXPO 75 

OKINAWA JAPAN 
JULY 19. 197S 
JANUAHV 20 1976 





■ 



ag American Revolution Bicentennial Administration 

ad. Jack Masey 

de George Nelson and Company 




ag USIA 

ad John Vorhes 

de John Vorhes 




United Slates Information Agency 

Bill Caldwell 

Lou Nolan 

Lou Nolan 

various 




ag. United States Information Agency 

ad. Bill Caldwell/Jay Taylor 

de Michael David Brown 

ill. Michael David Brown 



ag. United States Postal Service 

ad. David Foote 

de Luebbers & Jarret 

ph Al Freni 




ag. United States Information Agency 



ad B 
de B 

ill. B 



II Caldwell 
Caldwell 
Caldwell 



ag United States Information Agency 

ad Bill Caldwell 

de Ethel K Freid 

ill Ethel K Freid, Dan Smith 

ph Paul Starzinski, National Geographic, and others 



/MOK3I1W0MG1 





ag Alcohol Drug Abuse Mental Health Administration/ 

National Institute of Mental Health 
ad William E Bowman. Ill 
de William E Bowman. Ill 
ill William E Bowman. Ill 



ag. National Institutes of Health 

ad Ron Winterrowd 

de Charles R Gailis 

ill. Charles R Gail is 





> 



••„ 




The 
United States -Japan 

Cooperative 
Medical Science Program 



Audience: Program participants 

and interested medical 

researchers 

To develop a graphic mark that 

symbolically illustrates U.S./ 

Japan cooperation in medical 

research. 



ag. U S Department of Agriculture 
ad/de David Sutton 
ill Marcia Eddins 



ag United States Information Agency 



ad B 
de. B 
ill. B 



II Caldwell 
II Caldwell 
II Caldwell 



servi®enter science museums 




United Stales Department of Agriculture 



1 . The Planetarium projector at the Rochester. New York. 

Museum and Science Center is a composite of 160 separate 

projection systems that reproduces on the dome the appearance 

ot the night sky (or any Iirne and location on Earth. 




ag United Slates Information Agency 
■ ad. Bill Caldwell 

de Jane Deangelo 
i ill. Jane Deangelo 



ag. United States Information Agency 
ad Bill Caldwell 
de Dan Smith 




ag. United Stales Information Agency 
ad Ethel K Freid 
de Ethel K Freid 



ag. National Endowment for the Arts 
ad Nick Chaparos 
de Richard Foy 



W8M911375 



October 30-31 1975 
Denver, Cole 
Colorado Women s O : 
Houstoi 

IX.X 

Color.'! ho Montana 

Dakota Utah 



Federal 

Regional 

Design 

Assembly 

Western States 




i, 
ui 

i-E 

CHIT 

NICA 

ENVIh 

HITECTl 

JMMUNIC 

."URE-ENV 

•ARCHITEC 

■UNICATIONi 

i-ENVIRONMl 

CHITECTUREI, 

IE -VISUAL COM, 

E ARCHITECTURl 

IUNICATIONS-ARC 

ECTURE • VISUAL G 

■ICHITECTUREENVII 

JATIONS-ARCHITECTl 

NICATIONS ■ INTERIOR L 

ENVIRONMENTAL PLAN 

HITECTURE ■ INDUSTRIAL , 

IENTAL PLANNING • ARCHITECTURE- VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS • INTERIOR DESIGN • INDUSTRIAL DESIG* 

- INTERIOR DESIGN • LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING- VISUAL COMMUNICA' 

RCHITECTURE -VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS- ARCHITECTURE- INDUSTRIAL DESIGN ARCHITECTURE 

1 DESIGN • ARCHITECTURE VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS INTERIOR DESIGN INDUSTRIAL DES'' 

•5 DESIGN ■ LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE -ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING-VISUAL COMMUN 

"" IRE -VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS ARCHITECTURE ■ INDUSTRIAL DESIGN •ARCHITEC"' 

■=SIGN ARCHITECTURE VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS INTERIOR DESIGN INDUS' 

"SIGN • LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING- VISU/ 1 ' 

"VISUAL COMMUNICATION JRE INDUSTRIAL DESIGN • 

•'TECTURE VISUAL I M I ERIOR DESIGN • INDI '' 

"CAPE ARCHITECTURE • ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING-VISi ' 

• 'MUNICATIONS ■ AR< ' JDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

N- ARCHITECTURE- VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS- 1' 

*i LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE ENVIRONM r 

SUAL COMMUNICATIONS-ARCHITECTURE 

ING ARCHITECTURE -VISUAL COMMUNICA'i 

-IDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE-ENVIRONMENTAL 

,U AL COMMUNICATIONS -INTERIOR DESIGN-IN 

JHITECTURE ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING-VISI 

ATIONS ARCHITECTURE INDUSTRIAL DESIGN •* 

iTECTURE VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS INTERIOR 

ESCAPE ARCHITECTURE ENVIRONMENTAL PLAN 

.LCOMMUNICATIONS-AR^HITECTURE-INDUSTRIAL 



Audience: Worldwide (except 
America) 

To quickly identify American 
sponsored programs related to 
International Women's Year. 
Since a variety of programs would 
be sponsored during the year, a 
series of five posters was pro- 
duced to give a feeling of change 
yet of continuity. Space was pro- 
vided on the poster for the addi- 
tional imprinting of each program 
and local information. 



ECTUREVISUAL COMM 


NATIONS INTERIOR DESI 


JSC APE ARCHITECT! " 


"ONMENTAL PLANNING 
^INDUSTRIAL DES 


■ COMMUNICATIONS 


<CHITECTURE-VI C ' 


INS-INTERIOR DE 


■LANDSCAPE At" 


MENTAL PLANNI, 


SUALCOMMU' 


NDUSTRIAL Dt 


ITECTURE -V 


""R DESIGN IN 


vIDSCAPE ' 


'iNING-VISl 


«L COMM' 
»L DES' 


-■ESIGN-* 


'NTERI 


rllOP ' 


'ALP. 


HIT- 


~-Th 



United States Department of Transportation 
Thomas Geismar/Amencan Institute of Graphic Arts 
Cook & Shanosky Associates 



ag United States Postal Service 

ad- David Foote 

de. Vincent E Hoffman 

ill Phil Landry 















Symbol Signs 




( 

do 

a 


X 




+ 
f 


fit 

a8 


Contention* 


5 


?i 


■P 


T 


iffi 


= 


* ■ * 


iii 


iii 


\Ja 


^a 




<§> 


■■■■Bill 


® 


P 


o 



Famous 
last words 









r 








,-T 








/ 






BPtWM 








^C^Lo 








«# J 








/;"[' 7®^ 








Y x S Jr 1 








^ 






Y' 


• ^V 


rVy^i 



"I know 
every turn 
in the road..." 



Audience: General public 
To depict the results of a study 
undertaken to develop a set of 
symbol signs for use as Federal 
standards in all U. S. transporta- 
tion-related facilities. 



ag United States Postal Service 

ad David Foote 

de Vincent Hoffman 

ill Phil Landry 



ag. United States Information Agency 

ad. Bill Caldwell/Jay Taylor 

de Zeb Rogerson 

ill. Zeb Rogerson 



Famous 
last words 




"I can be in 
and out of the yard 
before he notices...' 



■ 



AMERICA 



books 




ag United States Information Agency 

ad Bill Caldwell/John Walsh 

de Bill Caldwell 

ill Bill Caldwell 



ag. United States Information Agency 

ad Bill Caldwell/John Walsh 

de Bill Caldwell 

ill Bill Caldwell 



TIME 

COVER 

ART 



An Exhibition of 
Time Magazine 
Cover Art 





ag National Park Service 

ad Vincent Gleason 

de Dennis McLaughlin 

ill Ivan Chermayeff 



ag National Park Service 

ad. Vincent Gleason 

de Dennis McLaughlin 

ill Leonard Baskin 

ph Robert Lautman 




ag National Park Service 
ad. Vincent Gleason 
de Dennis McLaughlin 
ill. Carol Summers 



ag National Park Service 

ad. Vincent Gleason 

de. Nick Kirilloff 

ill Dan Mafia 




ag National Park Service 

ad Vincent Gleason 

de Dennis McLaughlin 

ill. Betty Fraser 



ag National Park Service 
ad Vincent Gleason 
de Dennis McLaughlin 










■ vf&t)iAd£.i*t.xpifr\ '!.ityjN4i.^^^r^^-^^D|Ai(M^Vvi: : .'! >m...- 






ag National Park Service 

ad. Vincent Gleason 

de Dennis McLaughlin 

ill Arnold Varga 



ag National Park Service 

ad Vincent Gleason 

de Dennis McLaughlin 

ill Ben Shahn 




The National Parks 



tarn 



CAPE COD 




CAPE COD NATIONAL St ASHORE MASSACHUSETTS I NATIONAL PARK SERVICE US DEPARTMENT Of THE INTERIOR ' 



NATIONAL PARK SERVICE Its DEPARTMENT OF TXE INTERIOR 



ag. National Park Service 

ad Vincent Gleason 

de Dennis McLaughlin 

ill Leonard Baskin 



ag United States Intormation Agency 



ad B 
de B 
ill. B 



Caldwell 
I Caldwell 
I Caldwell 



.^M'^^m-v-y mum 




ag United Slates Information Agency 

ad Bill Caldwell 

de Bob Altemus 

ill Bob Altemus 

ph various 



ag National Park Service 

ad. Vincent Gleason 

de. Dennis McLaughlin 

ill BenShahn 



O U R O 



YNAG OGUE1 




ag. National Park Service 
ad Vincent Gleason 
de Paul Rand 



ag. National Endowment for the Arts 
de. Ivan Chermayeff 

Richard Saul Wurman 
ph. George Krause 




ag United States Postal Service 

ad David Foote 

de. Terretice McCaffrey 



ag United States Postal Service 

ad David Foote 

de Ford-Byrne 

ph Ford-Byrne 



,■ »y- 



'Don't fire unti 
the whites of theirl 




ag Agency for International Development 

ad Daniel F Shea 

de Robert Lovelace 

ill Robert Lovelace 



ag. U. S. Department of Agriculture 
de. Marcia Eddins 




Hutrients and 
Foods for Health 



i *ltu.,»l»-. r>*t. ... .om.ll 



v<z?:^ 




ag Farm Credit Administration 

ad Jerry Pavey 

de Jerry Pavey 

ill Jerry Pavey 

cw Chris Quinn 



ag. National Park Service 

ad. Vincent Gleason 

de. Nick Kirilloff 

ill Alan E Cober 



America's Agricultural Heritage 





A Farm in Colonial Virginia 



ag Western States Arts Foundation 
National Endowment lor the Arts 
de Richey/Shiramizu 
cw Brennan Rash 



ag Food and Drug Administration 

ad Ticia Edwards 

de Zebulon Rogerson 

ill Zebulon Rogerson 

cw. Margaret Morrison 




Audience: Arizona residents 
To present through the use of 
typography and color the rhythm 
and spirit of the flamenco dance. 



When buying and using cosmetics, read 
the label. Follow directions exactly. Wash 
your hands before applying a cosmetic. 
Close containers after each use, to 
prevent contamination. Be especially 
sure eye cosmetics are kept clean. 
Use aerosols in well-ventilated rooms 
only. Keep cosmetics out of children's 
reach. Remember -cosmetics can make 
you look and feel more attractive, but 
they can't make you younger or change 
you permanently. Use them correctly 
and safely. 




ag National Aeronautics and Space Administration 

ad Design Associates. Inc. 

de. Paul Dunbar 

ill Davis Meltzer 

cw Nicholas Panagakos 




ag United States Information Agency 

ad Dave Moore 

de Dave Moore. Dorothy Fall, Patricia Gipple. Bob Altemus 

III Dorothy Fall, Bill Park, Arnold Roth 

ph numerous 

ed Leonard Reed 







ag United States Information Agency 

ad Dave Moore 

de Dave Moore. Joseph Morgan, Dorothy Fall. Patricia Gipple. 

William McMillan, Thurman French 
ph. numerous 
ed Leonard Reed 



ag United States Information Agency 

ad Dave Moore 

de. Dave Moore, Patricia Gipple, Dorothy Fall 

Thurman French, William McMillan 

ill John Heinly 

ph numerous 

ed Marione Yahraes 




AMePHKQ 



FIEHATb: CAMOE HEIIOKOPHOE M3 
CPEHCTB MACCOBOM MHCDOPMAUMM 



TPMEYHA HMTATEnfl 




nPECCA CLUA 



CBo6o^a m or- 

BeTCTBeHHOCTb 









ZlHTepecHo 
oaGcrraTb 
b ra3eie 




','' ] ,' ™ ."' ! £5i : ''.:' 





ag United States Information Agency 
ad Bob Banks 
de Bob Banks 
ill Bob Banks 
cw Nancy Hild 



ag United States Information Agency 
ad Sam Burlockoff 
de Sam Burlockoff 

Bob Altemus 
pe Ellen Toomey 
ed Nancy Hild 




ag United Stales Information Agency 
ad Bob Banks 
de Bob Banks 
ph Mike Mitchell 
cw Nancy Hild 



ag United States Information Agency 

ad Bill Caldwell 

de Bill Caldwell 

ill Bill Caldwell 

ph various 




7/ 




BUSINES &TE/RI5 
GETQGRHFR,^ 





ag Federal Energy Administration 

ad Richard A Wilder 

de. Fred Trailer 

cw Tony Spaeth 




American 
Energy 



Presidential 
Energy 
Program 
Briefing 

Federal Energy Administration 



American 
Energy 

Presidential 
Energy 
Program 
Briefing 

Federal Energy Administration 



Audience: General public 
To develop a symbol and identity 
system for the new agency. The 
words "Federal" and "Energy" 
were paramount to the design 
solution. Ligaturesorothertypo- 
graphical approaches were not 
to be considered. The symbol 
had to be reproducible in all 
sizes and colors. The system de- 
scribed in manual form had to be 
such that individuals from varied 
disciplines and schools of 
thought could readily support the 
identity program in their areas of 
expertise. The PMS colors and 
type choice provide a national 
availability for regional personnel 
and vendors to easily produce 
material within the standards. 




ag Department of Labor 

ad John Massey (Center lor Advanced Research in Design) 

de Dean Lindsay 

ill Mas Nakagawa 

cw Dean Lindsay 



ag American Revolution Bicentennial Administration 
ad Chermayetf & Geismar Associates 
de Chermayetf & Geismar Associates 



7.1 



Communications Mark 



Official Symbol of 
The American 
Revolution Bicentennial 



Guidelines 
for Authorized 
Usage 



Official 

Graphics Standards 

Manual 



Reproduction Materials 



U.S Department ol Labor Graphic Communication Standards 




^ r M ^ z-. 

o 




m 



7 ^6-t9l fe 



^oumo/v 




abc 




7 ^6-l9l fe 



Audience: General public 
To develop a system of graphic 
standards for the Bicentennial 
log and its applications. 



Audience: Department of Labor 

personnel 

To provide graphic standards 

manual for the Department to 

unify and coordinate all 

Departmental communications 

systems. 



^ 

£? 



,jCA- UT '°<V 



^*'OA, 




'''6- 19'* 



ag. Internal Revenue Service 

ad Don Lynn 

de Betty Moran 

ill Michael David Brown/Donald Komai 






Understanding 
Taxes 

Internal 
Revenue 
Service 



* 



This brochure contains 
information lor Teachers 
ana Principals and 
includes addresses and 
telephone- numbers ol 
IRS Understanding 
Taxes Coordinators 




11 



WW? 







If 





Understanding 
Taxes 









• 



\u 



fRlf 



ag. Internal Revenue Service 

ad Don Lynn 

de Sparkman & Bartholomew Associates, Inc 

pm. Betty Moran 

ill Pete Gonzales/Michael David Brown 




Chapter 1 Our 

Federal Tare 
System 




ag. National Endowment for the Arts 

ad David Hausmann 

de. David Hausmann 

ill. Michael David Brown 

ph various 

ed Andy Leon Harney 



ag. National Endowment for the Arts 

ad. David Hausmann 

de Jeanne Krohn 

ill. Jeanne Krohn 




Things You D< >n't Give Away 



MmcK-ig An,.h,n.b*.J 



■ -cultural post 



Publi* Service Jot 

Grow in the Art* 



,«-i..i, ci r\ ,,.b ■. ,.i..i .mi 

lUCIini Iff" Witlttbript 
..I l[n 1:11.1.1. I.K-1,1 1 . ,l|.| i.l|li^,K ■. II JlJinlillj ill .»H>t . "IT 

■ ipfcj »rn! wrt 
%t»f* si it.t Neighborhood Aih Ptvfnai 



-. ruhti. pl*il* 



I 




My nam 




!W^ 


~ willing pioccit with.r. th« young 
Nil.vc AnuKican cummunily In the 
M.ni, f «.i. -rc« T.rn* oi th« Indian 
oomMsullwim aymi and wrluJ*. 


n 




a:' 


SrciTfioi ■ M ■'■ ImoU Ti 'i* 

edited bv JimWh.it .,nd itdpioducl 
of Mtnnctola Poet* in the School* « 
p.oiccl ol COMPAS (Community 
Piootam* in the Am and Scwnetaf 
St P*ul and initially funded by Iht 
i National i ndowroem foi the Am 
J F« lurlhvi iniotnation o, lo. copies 


' 


by Black Cloud 1 
Heart of the Earth I 


igc 








A ol Time ol the lr.d^n cont.ct 


, . 


Minneapolis, ■ 


■■■■k. ^affl 




md my 1 1 h i' 


Minnesota 1 


M 


■ bAl(J2 



Inside 


■Ntoa i-*. ai < -i—... ) 

Mink !■ i- Li i' dMl 


1 cdft.il *[. arli i 

r« «* iu M «id 

I 

■ 


' ( ataiorin !■! A~<u>i > 

■ 

1 a..-l.n, Ik- t'xMi. IkI IMu 

rrn*, a i 9 








ag. National Endowment for the Arts 

ad. David Hausmann 

de. David Hausmann 

ill. Brian McCall 

ph. various 

ed. Andy Leon Harney 



ag. Library of Congress 
ad. Sarah L Wallace 
de Donna Carter 






tu 





^ N. 


tional EmLmmrni for the An, 


:alt 


«uc 1 September 1974 (gr>» 

XDSt 


A " J 1 -1- 

Arts and the 


.-.II. \,i, II, uip . 


Economy 


md " 










































.. ■•:.>-! pi.ll. 




. ■ ■ .- 






. 




















j. i^i »mi i<r >k->. f -- 








1.. tuprmv- N Un*irl* tad ... ' ,11 






1 Bilk ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 




.Hindi rnJc >vi<r> ,i. :«(<li iK..i 




DlEMC* Increased pTMluCbMI Ifcmfcn 


llS.- Milr.,..! (>l»rj .(..! INe fa* 


Amnoi m, in mrc Hed BtcGii Whet 


i , ., , , Qpm iW WUBon >"'f 






Summer is the 
Season for the Arts 



ipitnl projnmi Like plait ill cnir lh 






Inside 






Quarterly Journal 

O F " t fc E" t I B R A R Y OF C ON G R E S S 







—4 




Li 



Audience: Scholarly and library 
communities; general public 
To make available to the public, 
at reasonable cost, materials on 
the collections, services, and 
activities of the Library 
of Congress. 



I 







ag United Stales Postal Service 
ad David Foote 
de Peter Tasi 



ag. United States Information Agency 

ad Bill Caldwell 

de Bill Caldwell 

ill various 

ph. various 

cw Yuri Yelagin 



me United Slates P 

litestone collection or space accomplish 

cetetwatlon of Ihe Apollo Soy - - 



"MAN 
IS HIS 
OWN 
STAR..." 






ag Smithsonian Institution Press 

ad Stephen Kraft 

de Elizabeth Sur 

ph various 



ag Comptroller of the Currency 

ad. AmyMillen 

de Jack Lefkowitz 

ph Mike Mitchell 

cw. Alexander Graham, William Snyder 




Audience 

scholars 

To enable the reader to move 
easily through a mass of material. 
Second color is used for quotes 
and for decorative elements, 
which introduce new trains of 
thought within each chapter, as 
well as for chapter openings and 
illustration backgrounds. 



ag United States Information Agency 
ad Bob Banks 
de Bob Banks 
ill Bob Banks 
cw Leslie Loker 



ag United States Information Agency 

ad Sam Burlockoff 

de Sam Burlockoff 

pe. Ellen Toomey 

cw Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. 




| 






ag United States Information Agency 
ad Bob Banks 
de Sam Burlockoff 
ph Mike Mitchell 
cw Walter Froelich 



ag United States Information Agency 

ad Sam Burlockoff 

de Sam Burlockoff 

ill Franklin McMahon 

cw Nancy Hild 





ag Farm Credit Administration 

ad Jerry Pavey 

de Jerry Pavey 

ill Jerry Pavey 

cw Ron Enkson 



ag. Farm Credit Administration 

ad Jerry Pavey 

de Jerry Pavey 

ill Jerry Pavey 

ph Grant Heilman 

cw Hon Enckson 




The 

Cooperative 
Farm Credit 
System 



» 












g. National Endowment for the Arts 
le. James Johnson 
ih. James Johnson 
John Veltri 



ag National Endowment tor the Arts 
de David E. Hausmann 
ill Sparkman and Bartholomew, Assoc 
cw Judith G Smith 
Anne Clark 




museums 
usa 



national endowment for the arts 




Audience: Professionals, 
trustees, citizens and groups 
actively involved in the work or 
study of museums and other 
cultural institutions. 
To convey information of incred- 
ible quantity and statistical com- 
plexity to a lay audience. Clear 
charts and graphs laid out in a 
logical order were enhanced by 
the use of color screens. 



ag. National Park Service 

ad Vincent Gleason 

de Melissa Cronyn 

cw Zorro A Bradley 



ag Farm Credit Administration 

ad Jerry Pavey 

de Jerry Pavey 

ill Jerry Pavey 

ph Jerry Pavey 




CAT 
CATI 
CATIO 
CATION 
COMMUNICATIONS 




Monday. June 9 
8:00 dm Registralic 



COMM 
COM 



10 00 a 
10 20* 



Audience: General public 
To give a broad account of the 
history of the park site supported 
with ample pictorial material, all 
compiled in an inexpensive and 
compact booklet which also 
functions as a souvenir sales item 
for the park. 



. . ■ 

Reports 

■ 

■ 
Refreshment Break 
System wide Advertmng 

■ 



■ 
11 00 am Farm Credit Communicator* Fund 

■ 

■ 

i , 

11 20 am American Institute of Cooperation 

,.-u 
■ 

Si. F' ' 

■ 

■ 

■ 

Direct - 

11.30 am Lunch (unplanned) 
1 00 pm Individual Bank Mattings 

■ 

■ 
I 227 

Ban) ■■ h 

loi [Pul 






5 00 pm Adiouii 



n,F„ 



ag American Revolution Bicentennial Administration 
ad Chermayeff & Geismar Associates 
de Larry Kerbs/Elaine Rooney 



ag U S Department of Agriculture 
ad Marcia Eddins/Janice Proctor 
ill. Marcia Eddins/Janice Proctor 



Bicentennial 
Times 



? /s\ tu 



"7 6 -,< 



LABELS FOR FOODS DONATEDTO FAMILIES 





Bicentennial USA 



1975 



March 



April 



May 



12 3 4 5 



1 2 3 



2 3 4 5 6 7 §L_ 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4. 5_ 6_ 7 8 9 10 



9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 



m 



i 



16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 



23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30 31 



S 



25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



30 31 






ag National Park Service 

ad Vincent Gleason 

de NickKinlloff 

ill Alan E Cober 

cw John Luzader 





an unsuccessful climactic attack on Quebec When 
the invasion Failed and the Americans were forced 
to reireat from Canada in the spring of 1776. many 
soldiers and politicians blamed Schuyler lor the de- 
feat. Because of the rising criticism of the New York 
commander. Congress on June 16 directed General 
Washington lo make General Gales, then ad|utant 
general of Ihe Continental Army, commander of the 
n forces in Canada 



Gales arrived at Schuyler's headquarters In Albany 
believing that he was to eKercise complete command 
over the Norlhem Department Schuyler refused lo 
recognize Gales jurisdichon, however, pointing out 
lhal the congressional resolulions and Washington's 
fnslructlona limited Galea authority to operaiions in 
Canada Since the army was 'hen m New York, 
Schuyler maintained thai he was still in command 
o' Ihe cl-pjriment Pending clarification of Ihetl re- 
spective positions, Gales acquiesced and submitted 
lo Schuyler s authority 

After Congress confirmed Schuyler's interpretation, 
Gales remained in the norlh as commander at Tl 
conderoga As ihe next ranking senior officer under 
Schuyler, he also functioned as second In command 
of the Northern Department Both Schuyler and 
Gales tried lo adjusl to this less-than-ideal situation, 
but their personalities and perspectives made ad- 
justment diilicult. Schuyler was an aloof, class-con- 
scious conservative Although Gales had grown up 
on [he fringes of English upper-class soc ■ 
had been a career officer m the British Army before 
waa more democratic, both socially and 
politically. Sectionalism compounded their diffi- 
culties. New Engenders, whose attitudes loward 
Schuyler ran from critical to hostile, found Gates 
much more congenial and effective. Schuyler s 
much-publlciied lack of aggressiveness and the 
military misfortunes .jttt-ri.ling norlhem 0| 
earned him many Critfca In the arm, jr,;i C 
who considered Gates a more professional olhcer 
and the kind of commander the important i 
frontier required 

Late m 1776. at the direction ol Congress, Gates 
led Ihe Pennsylvania and New Jersey troops soulh 
lo join Washington for the campaign in New Jersey. 
For awhile Gates commanded at Philadelphia and 
then returned lo his old job as adjutant general In 
the meantime Congress had again grown dissatis- 
fied with Schuyler s handling ol mililary affairs in 



s\m> y^ 1 



'■ " ' /?» ,,!■■.: 







ag Smithsonian Institution Press 

ad Stephen Kraft 

de. Gerard Valerio 

III. multiple 

cw museum staff 




ag National Gallery of Art 
de Frances P Smyth 
au Diane Russell 






ag National Endowment tor the Humanities 
ad D DeChaby 
de Edvardo Zayas 



ag National Institutes of Health 

ad Ron Winterrowd 

de Betty Hebb 

ill Betty Hebb 



ag National Park Service 
ad Vincent Gleason 
de Dennis McLaughlin 

Linda Meyers 
cw James V Murfin 




177B 



NATIONAL 
PARK SERVICE 
GUIDE 



TO THE 

HISTORIC PLACES 
OF THE 
AMERICAN 
REVOLUTION 



1771 



foodJAllERqy 









ag United Stales Department of Transportation 

ad Thomas Geismar/Amencan Institute of Graphic Arts 

de Don and Karen Moyer 

ill. Cook & Shanosky Associates 



ag Smithsonian Institution 

National Museum of History and Technology 
de Robert Staples/Barbara Charles (Staples & Charles) 
ph Rick Steadry 



Symbol Signs 



OltteoiFac.l.Mlion 

■ . ■ 



No amount 




— — '///, ~ — 


EH 


S!=B=!S " ~™s§23|™ 


B E E3 n <S> 

© : @ k H ^ 

■ Si 


Mli pSSllf 


= " •••• 


o 


'SB 




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\ 



A 



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Xl 



Audience: General public 
To evaluate existing signage 
systems and to develop a set of 
standard symbol signs for use as 
Federal Standards in all U. S. 
transportation-related facilities. 



ag. National Endowment for the Arts 

ad David Hausmann 

de. Diane Croyle 

ill. Diane Croyle 




& Mngs 
Kesidencies 
fbrWiters 



-Writers in 
Developing 

Colleges 




Fellowships 
&< ■milts I'oi 

( OI1HMKSCTS 

&l Jhirllisrs 



Symphony 

.JOifluvsirn 
rroi>ram 



architecture 
+ environmental 

arte 
program 




Audience: Specific art audiences 
To reflect the subject matter with 
which the artist (audience) is in- 
terested. To maintain the unity of 
the series despite the individual- 
ity of each issue. Different type- 
faces appropriate to the different 
audiences are used. 



ag Library of Congress 
ad Sarah L Wallace 
de Kathryn C Burke 



ag Smithsonian Institution Press 

ad Stephen Kraft 

de Stephen Kraft 

ill Saul Steinberg 



To Set a Country Free 



• ■■: 



4& uk *kV; i / 1 



# 




f 


1, 


/ 


r^s?^ 




- 



iiJi 



, */i 



STEINBERG at the SMITHSONIAN 




THE METAMORPHOSES OF AN EMBLEM 

Foreword by John Hollander 



ttLtiU I 




> ■ - - 




ag National Park Service 
ad Vincent Gleason 
de Melissa Cronyn 



ag National Park Service 

ad. Vincent Gleason 

de Nick Kirilloff 

cw George E Davidson 



ag. Farm Credit Administration 

ad Jerry Pavey 

de. Jerry Pavey 

ill Jerry Pavey 




Consolidated Bonds 

of the 

Farm Credil Banks 




ag National Park Service 
de Susan Dynes 
ill Susan Dynes 



Consolidated Bonds 

of the 

Farm Credit Banks 

Financial Slatemenis 
December 1974 



Federal (_•:.■ I 

Federal Intermediate Credit 

■ i (operatives 



Consolidated Bonds 

ot the 

Farm Credit Banks 

Uatements 
ei 1973 






ag United States Information Agency 

ad Dave Moore 

de Dave Moore, Dorothy Fall, Patricia Gipple, 

Thurman French, William McMillan 
ill Alan Cober. Jacqui Morgan, Dorothy Fall, Ted Zeigler, 

Mark English, John Hemly, Paul Davis, Arnold Roth 
ph numerous 
ed Leonard Reed 



ag. Food and Drug Administration 

ad Jesse R Nichols, Jr 

de Donald Komai 

ill Michael David Brown 










V 



- ^ 



Newlear's 

Resolutions For Health 

And Safety 



^ 



■^ 






j 







llns is iiu- lime ol ycat i"i reflection on the 
yew pa i and planning foi [he yau ahead li is 
also the time foi making resolutions Here are 
a few the I ood and Drug Vdniini&traiion 

lends thai > ak< this year The) can 

help you have .1 safer and hi althici yeai 



r 





:irV> 



Audience: People of the 
Soviet Union 

These are special, single-subject 
issues of the only American pub- 
lication circulated in the Soviet 
Union. The problem is to design 
the magazine so that the subject 
is both interesting and alive to a 
readership that has only limited 
contact with the U. S. 







ag Food and Drug Administration 

ad Jesse R Nichols. Jr 

de Jack Lefkowitz 

ill Jack Lefkowitz 

cw. Margaret Morrison 



ag Department of Labor 

ad Richard Mathews 

de Richard Mathews 

ill. Richard Mathews/Leonardo DaVinci 



C " JJ-ft DEC. 1973-IAN. 1974 

ONSUMER 
Diiii'I III 



Don'l Lei 
Foodbornc 

Illness 

Spoil Vour 

Christmas 

Feasl 



./*•■ 



9li 




r 



j 




- - -e ttSMSS 




The Realities of Manpower Planning 




/j , ' <X 



W A 

'■'V 

kU r 



Audience: Labor, industry, 
education, and local government 
To illustrate "Manpower Plan- 
ning": Leonardo's Vitruvian man 
used to symbolize mankind; the 
rainbow used to symbolize hope 
for the future; pencils and words 
used to represent specific 
programs, problems and projects. 



M\ 






ag United States Civil Service Commission 

ad Mrs Lee Trees 

de Edvardo Zayas (Duffy & Associates) 

ill Edvardo Zayas 

cw Mrs Lee Trees 



ag National Institutes of Health 

ad Ron Winterrowd 

de Betty Hebb 

ill Betty Hebb 




ag. Western Slates Arts Foundation 
National Endowment for the Arts 

de. Richey/Shiramizu 

ph. Reginald Wade Richey 

cw Brennan Rash 
Nello McDaniel 
Ann Merlo 



ag. National Endowment for the Arts 
de. Ivan Chermayeff 

Richard Saul Wurman 

Ralph Caplan 

Peter Bradford 

Jane Clark 






i State* Ami Fo 



Montana 

Nevada 

New Me.icc 

Oregon 

Ulan 

Washington 

Wyoming 




r 



Audience: Federal Agency 
administrators and designers 
To piesent design projects which 
support the ten criteria for 
judging effective design. As an 
educational book, this publica- 
tion's illustrations and typography 
were chosen for clarity and 
directness of message. 



ag Smithsonian Institution Press 

ad Stephen Kraft 

de. Elizabeth Sur 

ph various & staff 



ag. Smithsonian Institution Press 

ad Stephen Kraft 

de Stephen Kraft 

ill multiple 

ph. multiple 

cw. multiple 









< 




<5' 



Audience: Students and 
interested laymen 
To group numerous illustrations 
as close to their text reference as 
possible by use of a grid system 
that allows maximum flexibility in 
size and placement of 
illustrations. 




■l** 







g. Library of Congress 
id. Sarah L Wallace 
ie. Kathryn C. Burke 



ag Smithsonian Institution Press 
ad Stephen Kraft 
de Elizabeth Sur 




Americana 

in 

Children's 
Books 










1&- 


t* 




jpv 


■ 4- 




(I 


m^> 




■$£ 


A 




r$ 


j$i 




**Gi 


Vv 




•J 


I 






ag National Institutes ot Health 

ad Ron Winterrowd 

de. Linda Brown 

ill Linda Brown 



ag Federal Reserve Board 

ad Mack Rowe 

de Barry Huber 

ill. Barry Huber 




nlenance of sound credit conditions, and the accommodatk 
merce, industry, and agriculture. The Federal Reserve 
prescribe regulations further defining within the limitation 
Act the conditions under which discounts, advancements, 
accommodations may be extended to member banks. Each 
reserve bank shall keep itself informed of the general chara 
amount of the loans and investments of its member banks 
ew to ascertaining whether undue use is being made of 
it for the speculative carrying of or trading in securities, n 
e, or commodities, or for any other purpose inconsistent w. 
maintenance of sound credit conditions; and, in deU 
her to grant or refuse advances, rn!;srounts or other credit 
nodalions, the Federal reserve bank shall give consideration 
information. The chairman of the Federal reserve bank *A. 
r l to the Federal Reserve Board any such undue use of ba 
ny member bank, together with his recommendation. W 
\e judgment of the Federal Reserve Board, any member 
ing such undue use of bank credit, the Board may, in il 



ag Smithsonian Institution Press 

ad Stephen Kraft 

de Natalie Bigelow 

ph various 



ag Farm Credit Administration 

ad. Jerry Pavey 

de. Jerry Pavey 

ill Jerry Pavey 



Made in 
Chicago 




Agriculture is our Nation's 


Like all mode 


. 


The Federal U 


nd Banks 










latgnl industry and cenainiy 




anchers need 




ad by the 














and their 


Federal Farm 


oan Act ol 














operations W 


uch of this 


1916 Initially < 


apiialued by 












OSMntlHl segments of our 


capital is bor 




ihe U S Gove 


nmenl, they 




















ol Ihe 












growing population requires 


the 12 Federc 




Government s 


nveslment in 








1 *■ 




increased amounts ol lOoO 




d"o "f 9 ,he 


19J7 and since 














and natural fiber products 


captral'rteede 


completely on 


ned by ihe 












This means thai farmers and 


ranchers They make long 
term loans secured bv first 


SeThe^w 


vices The 


■ 










sue of (heir operations. 


mortgages or 


larm real estate 


local Federal 


and Bank 












utilize bigger and more 
expensive equipment, build 


Federal Lanp 


Ban" 800 ' 0Cal 


ihe Banks make loans have 










more and larger buildings. 


country 


across the 


Mosi ol 'he lu 


ds loaned by 












scientific and technological 






are acquired) 






l 3Sr§fv i 


UK 












ol Consolidate 


d Federal 




mm? A 








Yea. agriculture is a thriving. 






Farm Loan Bonds, more 










prosperous and big business 






commonly kno 


wn as Federal 


















Land Bank Bonds The 












is an Induslry essential lo 






purpose of thi 


leaflet is to 












everyone 






explain the features ol 1 hose 




jqfjj] 












investments to 


rrHavored 


^fl 














50 years 




He i 










Audience: General public 
To communicate a feeling of 
boldness in design, already 
shown in the photographs, 
through the use of bold headers, 
bright colored end sheets, shiny 
stock, and large-scale photo- 
graphs. For the sake of unity, a 
tight layout grid was used 
throughout. 



ag. National Endowment for the Arts 

ad Nick Chaparos 

de. Nick Chaparos/Bill Lacy 

cw. Roy Knight 



ag. Comptroller of the Currency 

ad Amy Millen 

pm Amy Millen 

W. A. Howland, Jr. 

de. Jack Lefkowitz 

ill. Pamela Lefkowitz 

cw. Amy Millen 






ag National Institutes of Health 

ad Ron Winterrowd 

de Charles R Gailis 

ill Charles R Gailis 



ag Smithsonian Institution Press 

ad Stephen Kraft 

de Elizabeth Sur 

ph David Blume 




ience: Medical and scientific 
researchers 

To develop the first issue of an 
annual report on medical re- 
search advances at NIH. Publica- 
tion used as the primary recruiting 
instrument of NIH as well as the 
report to the medical community 
and the Congress on the accom- 
plishment of the past year. 



ag Internal Revenue Service 

ad Don Lynn 

de Don Lynn 

ill Bill Miers 



National Park Service. 
Denver Service Center 
Richard J Kusek, AIA 
Richard J Kusek, AIA 
Paul Zenisek 




Audience: General public 
To provide IRS contribution to be 
used with eleven other cubes 
representing the twelve bureaus 
of the Treasury Department for a 
Bicentennial display. Highly 
graphic effects using primary 
colors were used to tell the IRS 
story in simple graphic terms. 



Audience: The vacationing public 
The problem was to design a 
ranger station, comfort station, 
showers and change booths at 
Cape Hatteras National Seashore 
expressing the policy of leaving 
nature's shifting sands and seas 



unimpeded. The solution was an 
elevated boardwalk connecting 
building modules and a shade 
structure, meant to catch the 
breeze, all in a weathering wood. 



3 National Park Service 
i David Hughes 
3 David Hughes 
David Hughes 
1 David Hughes 



ag 



United States Dept of Agnculture/U S Forest Service 
William R Bruner 





Audience: Vistors to the 
Grand Canyon 
To develop a dynamic visitor 
identity program which unifies 
the multi-route bus system (three 
separate overlapping routes). To 
design signs flexible enough to 
show occasional route changes 
with no structural modifications 
to the signs. To function without 
competing with the surrounding 
environment. To provide hiking 
and safety information in both 
English and Japanese. To provide 
large, lightweight and inexpen- 
sive benches. Three colors are 
used to visually enhance the 
identity system and to differenti- 
ate the three routes. Route 
alternations are accomplished 
with removable surface vinyl dots 
on the stop location signs. 



ag National Park Service 
de Susan Dynes 
ill Susan Dynes 



ag Federal Energy Administration 
de Ron Hughes/Unigraphics, Inc 




Design Standards 



Federal Energy 
Conservation Programs 





TheSymbol 



cee 



c 



Audience: American people 
To establish an identity program 
for the Office of Marketing and 
Education which would (1) es- 
tablish a mark for use by all 
agencies engaged in energy con- 
servation education programs, 
which would not interfere with 



design programs already under- 
taken; (2) set standards for visual 
materials to be prepared by the 
Office, including materials pre- 
pared by contractors; (3) incor- 
porate the concept of energy 
conservation in the design. 



ag General Services Administration 
de Vivien Woofter 

Suzonna Moore 

Cynthia Panati 
re James B Knox/Hunter Associates 
ph Robert Lautman 

John Drust 
si RTKL Associates 



HEW 






A/S Reception 
& Conference 





FWlS«fV=* * 



5 



■ 



4 

HEW Cafeteria 



2 



2 

HEW 



A S Reception & 
Conference 



HEW 







Typical 
Conference 



l~ii 



'1 

J 



3 


Executive 


HEW 


Offices 


■■ 


*P ' 


mm 


L liJmm 


■ 




%**) 


■ 




■ 'P 




Tvrjical Floor Plan 




„ SIGNING, 

GRAPHICS & 

INFORMATION 

SYSTEM 



USER MANUAL 






4th 

Street 

and 

Independence 

Avenue 

aw. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 
THE SOUTH PORTAL BULLUNG 




ag. Environmental Protection Agency 
de. Barry Howard Associates 
ph. Donald Moran 



ag. U S. Department ot Agriculture 
ad George Baka 




>-^ 


> 












JHH 


_~ * 




L?5 


|, f ^ % ^fjfjj 





ag US Department ol Agriculture 

pm David Sutton 

de David Sutton 

ad Kris Jorgensen 





AGWClATlWAt 
RfSEARCH 

sarvia 




AGR 

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOP 

abcdefghijklmnopqrsti 



AGR1CUL 




LETTUa 

PRODUCTION IN 

THE UNITED STATES 



LETTUCE 

PRODUCTION IN 

THE UNITED STATES 



INITIAL FACILITIES FOR 
A REGIONAL WHOLESALE 

FOOD DISTRIBUTION 
CENTER AT NEW ORLEANS 



INITIAL FACILITIES FOR 
A REGIONAL WHOLESALE 

FOOD DISTRIBUTION 
CENTER AT NEW ORLEANS 




LETTUCE PRODUCTION 
IN THE UNITED STATES 








USOA 

AGWCUTL.KAL 
RESARCH- 
COLLMB1A 





, 



Audience: Scientific and 
technical research community 
To design a symbol which repre- 
sents the agency. The center core 
is a flame for research relating to 
the land about it. To design a 
graphic system to handle a wide 
variety of titles and subtitles and 
statements of cooperative agree- 
ments. Top centered format and 
bottom identity strips utilize con- 
stant and variable information. 
All publications are in two sizes. 



ag Chesapeake Division 

Naval Facilities Engineering Command 
ar Richard A Baxter 
id Ken Murray 
de Hellmuth.Obata & Kassabaum (St Louis) 



ag United States Forest Service 
ar Robert C Sandusky 




Audience: U. S. Marines 
To provide living space, dining 
facility, exchange store, gymna- 
sium and athletic facilities, clubs, 
barbershop, press shop, and 
parking for 420 Marines. Design 
consideration was given to the 
restrictive site (triangular shape, 
bordered on one side by an 
expressway and bisected by an 
expressway ramp), the height 
restrictions imposed by the 
Capital Hill location, and the 
historical character of the exist- 
ing Marine barracks across the 
street. 




Audience: Research facility 
workers 

To design a structure to house 
the Pacific Southwest Forest and 
Range Experiment Station in such 
a way as to leave undisturbed the 
maximum number of trees. Pri- 
mary study of the Station is the 
ecology of the redwood forest. 



Composite Medical Facility. Grifliss AFB, NY 

ag United States Air Force 

de MaxO Urbahn Associates, Inc (New York. New York) 

ph. MaxO Urbahn Associates, Inc (New York, New York) 



ag General Services Administration 
de Glen Paulsen, FAIA/ 

Tarapata MacMahon Paulsen Associates 
ph Daniel Bartush 




Audience: Active duty military 
and other authorized personnel 
To design a composite military 
medical facility to serve total 
health care needs in the Rome, 
New York, area within established 
program and constraints on 
scope and budget. To accomp- 
lish these goals while providing 
for the requirements of a northern 
climate. To preserve natural trees 
and take advantage of the drop in 
elevation to provide service 
access with a separation of 
mechanical and care levels. 



ag General Services Administration 

ad Paul Arthur/Gary Wells 

de. Paul Arthur 

ill Paul Arthur 




ag United States Department of Commerce 
de Barry Howard & Associates, Inc 
Scarsdale. New York 



ag. U. S. Department of Agriculture 

ad. David Sutton 

de. Concepts/Gary Jacquemin 




Audience: Exhibition attendees 
To communicate the positive 
aspects of the Federal Govern- 
ment's interest in environmental 
issues. Heavy emphasis is placed 
on science and technology as 
valuable tools not only in dealing 
with the restoration of the envi- 
ronment, but in dealing with 
future human needs, while main- 
taining an acceptable quality 
of life. 






ag United Slates Department of Health, Education and Welfare, 

Social and Rehabilitation Service 
ad John Philion (Blair, Incorporated) 

Robin Atkiss (SRS) 
de John Philion (Blair, Incorporated) 
ph Mike Mitchell 




ag U S Department ot the Interior, 

National Park Service 
ad Russ Hendnckson 
de Walton D Stowell. AIA 
pm Walton D Stowell. AIA 
ph. Larry S Williams 




ag. Environmental Protection Agency 

ad. Gifford D Hampshire 

de Steve Wilson 

ph. ENTHEOS 

cw Steve Wilson 




»g. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Commission 

id Becky Eason/Graham Associates, Inc. 

le. Steve Alexander 

>h. Stephen Szabo 

:w. Tom Wagner 




jguir ^ 



ag American Revolution Bicentennial Administration 
de Frederick Figall 
ph Frederick Figall 




!&?t 



/^rr^Crrrr 

. v-r— r /r-rrfn i 

^rrrvrrrrr,rrrrT 
rrr/rrrrnrrrrcriM; 

r^'^iErrFn^rrrrrrKiziZii 
f FF/i\r>-' r Pf/f ifrffFFFt r~ r 
vrr rrr-^rrrtrrrrrrrrv-p 

rr,r^rrrrrrrrr;,rnr"ri 



,' 




(Design For People Film) 

National Endowment for the Arts 

Fred Brink 

Tom Gormely 

Mary Simms 

Fred Brink 

Rob Whirtlesy 

Kevin Burke 

Joan Shantz 



Film (USArt. The Gift of Ourselves) 
ag National Endowment for the Arts 
ad. Tim Radford 
de Universal Studios 



ag US I A 
pm David Paul 
ad Gardiner Meade 
de Paul Kervin 




W^j'-t 


\ Yl 


Tlv^ 


W*^ 


^-^ ^ 

•* 

*^>^ 


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Audience: Second Federal 
Design Assembly attendees 
To present the point of view of 
the citizen, the response of the 
end-user to government graphics 
and publications. To impress an 
audience of Federal administra- 
tors and designers with the 
reality of how individuals identify 
their Government through its 
visual communications. 



Audience: General public 
To present 200 years of U. S. art 
in 26 minutes providing the 
broadest definition of the arts. 
Animation with pacing used that 
corresponds to the style of the 
discipline and period plus humor 
and nostalgia. 



(Music in the Air Film) 

ag. National Endowment for the Arts 

pr. Tim Radford 

di. Don Lenzer (Don Lenzer Films) 

ed. Jay Freund 



("The Navigators") 

ag Naval Facilities Engineering Command 

ad Richard A Genders 

de Richard A Genders 

ph Richard A Genders 



HUD Film 
ag. Department of Housing and Urban Development 
ad. Institute for Community Design Analysis 
de Institute for Community Design Analysis 
ill. Institute for Community Design Analysis 
ph. Institute for Community Design Analysis 
cw. HUD & Institute for Community Design Analysis 




i 






e3*=- 










'•' 




EBB 

mKmi 

0" 



■ 



as 



,-#: 






lake a look at 
America today... 




warts and all 



When Oliver Cromwell had his portrait painted, he instructed the artist 
to record his face "warts and all." This is exactly what America's leading 
photographers have done today through the United States Environmental 
Protection Agency's DOCUMERICA Project. Designed to show the impact 
of man on his environment, the DOCUMERICA pictures are sometimes 
appealing, sometimes appalling, often ugly. ..but always honest. And they 
are yours for editorial uses to emphasize our environmental concerns, 
almost for the asking. Berkey K + L has been named custodian of the 12,000 
original 35mm color transparencies now in the DOCUMERICA file. We have 
a complete reference file on color microfiche film cards (4" x 6" cards each 
holding 60 images). Microfiche readers are available at Berkey K ■+ L for your 
use in selecting photographs by appointment.The photos are available as either 
transparencies, color prints or B&W prints at no charge other than lab costs. 



. Berkey K + L 
&Documerica 

Check DOCUMERICA out at Berkey k* L 
Custom Services, Inc., 222 East 44th Street, 
New York. N.Y. 1(X)17. Or, if you are in a 
hurry, call 212-661-5600 and ask for the 
DOCUMERICA File. 



^7ri/ 7 '?/ r 6 \Americans caert y sAotfar coJ/a/torati/wr axtAtAe voritt&A/. 



^Bat?to ce/e/>rat& tA& taw Aimdredtkj/ear of oar aia^€na / eric&, 
jfyterg^stfAa/er i&hroad to coJ/a6ora£& untA tfi& S^ritisA 
to- l>ruw^oas tA& ''Qu>ooyrotmdAa/id " tAataxis tA&slanaaro ofcommerc&, 
t/i£s/<fe/y/ob^of<m/^/iatlo/?/, tAe/i/ and ziotm** 



^A&&cri^Jr>r '7& 
6ys MattAeiih Garter 




Mergenthaler Linotype Company, an Eltra company, Mergenthaler Drive, Plainview N.Y. 11803, (516) 694 1300. 



Center 
For 

Exhibit 
Systems 



An exhibit should communicate. The Center for Exhibit Systems 1 . Perimeter 



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CD 

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But, it should also be practical 
Cost, shipping requirements, 
space limitations all must be 
considered. 



meets these challenges with 
exhibit systems that use f ire- 
retardant paperboard as the 
primary display material. 

The Center seeks solutions for 
individual client needs through 
three basic exhibit systems. 



Is a multi-purpose paperboard 
exhibit system. It's lightweight 
and economical. Panels can be 
shaped into circles, lines, or 
angles. No length limit. Maximum 
height is eight feet. Panels 
accommodate graphics, 
photography, and various 
finishes. Lighting systems are 
available. 

2. Perimeter 10 

Is a complete 10-foot exhibit in 
a box. Exhibit panels, base 
track, connecting hardware. 
Lights are shipped separately 
for extra protection. The 
tracking system is plastic and 
the panels are paperboard. So 
it's a lightweight box to handle 
and ship. 

3. Perimeter 12 

Is a modular paperboard exhibit 
system that's economical and 
extremely flexible. Paperboard 
modules (40" wide x 31" high x 
8" deep) act as building blocks — 
to be used separately or 
together. Modules are light- 
weight and compact. Twelve fit 
together (3 high and 4 across) 
for a standard 10' booth 



The Center for Exhibit Systems 
is anxious to meet your specific 
problems with innovative, and 
practical solutions. 



For more information: 
Fred Steiner 

Center for Exhibit Systems 

645 North Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 6061 1 
(312) 786-5580 



Case Histories 



Problem 

Chicago '74, the annual art 
director's show, needed an 
exhibit system to act as a 
backdrop for various displays. 
The system had to be economi- 
cal, because it would be used 
only once. But, it had to be 
visually exciting due to the 
nature of the show. 



Problem: 

JDS. Printer Craftsmen, Inc. 
needed an exhibit with a large 
area for prominent graphics. It 
had to be low cost and ready in 
three weeks. The display had to 
be strong enough for future 
showings— and easily stored. 
The graphics had to be sharp 
and precise. 



Problem 

The U.S. Department of Labor 
needed a flexible modular 
exhibit system to use in branch 
offices and for promotions, 
seminars, and trade shows. The 
system had to be lightweight 
and compact for shipping, and 
it had to be adaptable to widely 
varying space limitations. 



Solution: 

Chicago '74 contacted the 
Center for Exhibit Systems. 
The solution was a series of 
walls made from Perimeter 
panels. The panels served as a 
guide through the entire show. 
The Perimeter system met all 
necessary space, handling, and 
budget requirements. 



Solution 

J.D.S. Printers contacted the 
Center for Exhibit Systems. The 
solution was a Perimeter 10 
display with a roller coated 
solid background and a high 
gloss varnish finish. To save 
costs on silk screening, rub-off 
lettering was used. The entire 
exhibit was ready on time and 
within budget. It knocks down 
easily for storage in two boxes. 

Solution 

The Department of Labor con- 
tacted the Center for Exhibit 
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INC. 



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A time-saving "in-house" capability for 
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Announcing the only 
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275 North Street 
Teterboro, N.J. 07608 




3M Brand Promat Model 100.. .a headline compositor for 
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Name_ 
Title_ 



-Company. 



_Phone 



Address. 
City 



_State_ 



JZip_ 



13 



etter Letter dry 



transfer lettering. 
It's what it doesn't 

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Like peel, crack, 

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Find out Ask for 
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t 1 ! 



ii® 



Division of The C-Thru Ruler Company 
6 Britton Drive. Bloomfield. Connecticut 06002. 203-243-0303 




Since 1954 more than a 
quarter of a million people 
have benefited from these 
workshops. We're sure you 
will too. You'll have the 
opportunity to hear from 
presentation experts and 
learn about interesting 
processes and techniques. 
You'll then practice, explore 
and create your own exciting 
visual concepts... with 
expertise. 

For complete information 
about Tecnifax Visual 
Communication Workshops, 
simply fill out the postpaid 
card and mail now! 



SCOTT GRAPHICS 



Yes, I'm interested in the Tecnifax Visual Communication Workshops 



Please send: 

□ complete information regarding workshop location, 
times and program itinerary. 

□ current GSA Supply Schedule for Tecnifax brand products. 



Name. 



Organization 

Address 

City 



State 



Zip 



tretecn \mmx 



— ♦ * MENU *♦— 

The importance of visual communication — how 

visuals can help in the understanding and retention of 

information. 

The Diazo Process — what it is, how to use it, how 

you can put it to work for you. 

Overhead projection, rear view projection, 35 mm. 

projection, motion picture and TV techniques — a 

look at them individually and collectively (including the 

multi-media approach.) 

Color and composition — how to utilize them to 

create mood and emphasis. 

Photographic and photo-reflex equipment 

techniques — how they can help you build more 

effective presentations. 

Polarization — how to create unusual effects such as 

highlighting, fade-outs and motion. 

Non-projected techniques — an examination of 

chalk boards, flannel boards, flip charts and other 

demonstration tools. 

Plus free-wheeling periods — time to create and 

develop visuals of your own — under expert guidance. 



Here's 
a sampling 
of what 
we have 
prepared 
for you... 



The Tecnifax Visual 
Communication Workshop 
is a shirtsleeves seminar, 
not a textbook (theory) 
course. Our program has 
been carefully planned to 
actively involve all partici- 
pants. You'll learn not only 
from your own explorations, 
but also from each member 
of your group. And you'll 
"graduate" enriched and 
refreshed ... a more com- 
plete designer of communi- 
cation and presentation 
materials. 



©I 



First Class 
Permit No. 62 
Holyoke, Mass. 



Business Reply Card 

No postage stamp necessary if mailed in the United States 



Seminar Director 

Scott Graphics, Inc. 

Holyoke, Massachusetts 01 040 



CARD MISSING? 

For complete information 
about the Tecnifax Visual 
Communication Workshop, 
write to: 

Seminar Director 
Scott Graphics, Inc. 
Holyoke, Massachusetts 0104 




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Design. 

Brought to you by Sparkman and Bartholomew Associates 

1 1 20 Connecticut Ave., N.W. 

Suite 464 

Washington, D.C. 20036 

(202)785-2414 



f n 




To create. . . to surpass. . . to achieve . . . 
and know the joy that comes with developing an 
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To reach this often elusive goal, the selective, 
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If you have not already discovered an 
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o model IOOO| shown; 
4 models available 


%ART O GRAPH 


art a graph inc 

529 SOUTH SEVENTH STREET, MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 55415 TELEPHONE: 612-336-18(1 





Gestalt Associates, Inc. 

901 N. Washinatan Street 
Alexandria, Virginia 22314 

683-1126 



NOW IN WASHINGTON 

Dry Transfer Lettering 
Now Available At 

llariowt* 

More economical, longer shelf life 

Over 200 faces & charting tapes 

Custom logos from your art 

Rapid delivery service 

Call your Harlowe representative 

6£8-737£ 

This complete ad prepared with Geotype 




adcom inc. 

502 WEST BROAD STREET, FALLS CHURCH VIRGINIA, 22046 - (703) 534-8183 main store 
9230 WARREN STREET, SILVER SPRING MARYLAND, 20910-1301) 587-2820 branch 




□ solid structured bold innovative graphics a 




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SO/SO 

GRAPHtCS 

screen process printing /exhibits and displays 
409north stonestreet ave., rockville, md. 424-6866 




stralr 



Chances are you've new 
heard our name befor 
but that's alright! We pr 
vide art and photograph 
services for 35mm visua 
to some of the most sophi 
Heated governmental agei 
cies, industrial firms, an 
advertising agencies i 
the Eastern United State, 



Somedav. 



picture. 







Stanford Paper Company, Inc. 

3001 V Street. N E . Washington, D C 20011 
202 • 526-1600 



VISUAL 

sjsreMs 



CO. INC. 



representing 
quality 

in 
graphic art 

supplies 



Fuller &d Albert 

SUPER 

STORE! 

Photographic Equipment, 
Supplies, Accessories 
Geared To Serving 
The Professional 
(And the Serious Amateur) 

No doubt about it. Fuller 
&d'Albert is a photo- 
graphic Superstore! We 
represent literally dozens 
of manufacturers and 
suppliers, featuring every- 
thing from Agfa to Zero. 

We carry: Photogenic, 
Norman, Bowen, Mole- 
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Professional Cibachrome, 
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Kreonite darkroom 
equipment & processors, 
to name just a few. 

Aristo, Beseler, Bolex, 
Kodak, Eumig, G.E., 
Honeywell, llford, Leitz, 
Mallory, Nikon, Omega, 
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just to name a few more. 
And there's much, 
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Free Seminars— Lectures 
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monthly publication, 
PHOTOPHAX. Art Gallery 
for photographers. 



Everything [ fljllCr& 

Photographic \lllillllErt 
Since 1915 

703 591-8000 

Open Monday thru Saturday, 
9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
31 70 Campbell Drive 
(just west of Fairfax Circle 
off Rt. 50), Fairfax, Virginia 



CloseoutSali 




For 4 long years, while 
the greed-is-our-creed crowd 
was milking us dry and 
hollering, "inflation made me 
do it." good old Phil gallantly 
fought to hold the line at 
SI. 7 5 a word. 

And lost. 

The time has come to 
scrap his WIN button or 
follow N.Y. city down the 
tubes. 

But there's still time to 
stock up on headlines at 
the old price (while Phil gets 



himself into gear and gets 
new forms printed up.) 

He has 700 mostly 
lovely typefaces and you get 
overnight service without 
even asking for it. 

Fora limited time only, 
this town's greatest headline 
buv still lives. 

•PHOTO inc 

2107 K ST NW W/aSH DC 20037F 
202 293 2214 




Eclectic 

Design Interiors 
Commercial and Private 



Robert Sankey Hartmann 
Ann Bleakley Catlin 
202-363-6839 



liililll 



N 



sW^fiW Bill 

II lit III 



EDW\RDT.IBA 

31 8 3rd street, ne (rear) Washington . d c 20002 2025434419 




custom sound systems 
cabinets 
custom furniture 
reproductions of antiques 



I specialize in graphic 
design and photography 
for visual aides. My 
grapheon color slide is a 
very effective, efficient 
and a low cost com- 
munication device. I have 
a current and active GSA 
contract. Call me for 
more information. 



EARL F,' 
KEAT<§>N 



730 NO. LYNN ST. 
SUITE 400 
ARLINGTON, 
VA . 22209 



703/525 1154 




Share our point of view. We think that it is the practical and professional 
approach to graphic communications . . . The Art Production Company 
considers function to be the principal arbiter of good design. For us, good 
design emanates from proper planning, effective communication and realistic 
scheduling. The Art Production staff has consistently applied the concepts 
of graphics management, intelligent design and competent production to a 
great number of federal design projects including magazines, annual reports, 
exhibits, posters and brochures. So what makes our point of view so different? 
Experience. We presently design four federal periodicals and have partici- 
pated in the design of many more. We have completed over 150 projects for 
the federal government in the last four years. Specialization. We work ex- 
clusively in the government and non-profit sector. Idea Communications are 
not the same as Product Communications. We know the difference. Respon- 
sibility. We meet 
deadlines —every 
time.Discussyour 
next project with AlvinRosenbaum, 
The Art Production Company, 
1740 N Street, N.W., Wash 
ington, D.C. 20036. Tele- 
phone (202) 628-2900. 

Trading as Art Production, Inc. GSA Contract #GS-03S-43483. 



Share our 
point 

of view. 





. ..Savings 
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FOLDS 

COMPACTLY 

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BOARD 
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BOARD 
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from 30" 
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Versatile 
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drawing tables 

The Full-Time/Part Time Drawing Tables . . . quality-made for long 
life, with the professional features of a stationary drawing table 
. . . plus the easy portability for use anywhere. 

Sets up easily and instantly anywhere. Full 24"x36" and 30"x42" 
tops. Deluxe tables feature Techni/Top Boards, sealed and lacquered, 
and with metal wrap-around end cleats. Bases available in durable 
baked-on Red, Black or White enamel. 



NON-WARP 
TECHNI/TOP 
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Cross laminated 
with cellular core. 
Select softwood 
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STURDY 

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STABLE 

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T.M. 



DRAWING BOARDS 



ECONOMY SERIES 

Has most of the plus features usually 
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30"x42" 


FL3042B Black 


30"x42" 


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30"x42" 



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All the features of the Economy Series plus 
the drawing board is sealed and lac- 
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cleats. 



CATALOG NUMBER 


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DFL2436W White 


24"x36" 


DFL2436B Black 


24"x36" 


DFL2436R Red 


24"x36" 


DFL3042W White 


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DFL3042B Black 


30"x42" 


DFL3042R Red 


30"x42" 



STACOR 



Manufacturers of Lifetime Quality Equipment for Schools, Libraries and Industry 

STACOR CORPORATION 

GENERAL OFFICES: 285 EMMET STREET • NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 071 1 4 
PHONE AREA CODE 201 242-6600* PLANTS: NEWARK, N.J., SCRANTON. PA. 




Joel C Freid 
Photographer 

Member ASMP 



9324 Edmonston Rd 
Greenbelt, Md 
20770 



301 441-2992 



GS-03S- 43628 



©)oelC Freid 1975 




raphs 

.and lettering 
llustrations 
ayouts 
™ ■ lettering 



; T :Tt 



ions 
jblications 
lides 
vart 
vugraphs 



Give us your most 
complex jobs ■ ■ ■ 

and we will 
produce them. 



Hope 

Woodworking 
Company 

designers and builders of displays, signs & exhibits 
4226 howard avenue kensmgton. marylana 20795 

933-1451 



K .you think 
that: 



full bleed is a medical term 
Cooper bold is a brave barrel maker 
a three color job is an integrated bank robbery 
crop marks are used to measure harvests 
saddle stitching is what harness makers do 
a technical pen is an automated prison 
rubber cement is for repairing your galoshes 
a one point rule has to do with football 
a clean mechanical is a recently washed machine 
blue line is the name of a bus company 
color separation was declared unconstitutional 

■ llOtl * you c ' ont ^ ave any neec ' ^ or: Great ^ nc - 

U.KTJM* design and illustration (703) 83t>6020 




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ee 



FOR 

THE BEST IIM 

EXHIBIT DESIGN, 

CONSTRUCTION 

AND SERVICE 

TODAYS DISPLAYS, INC. 

45-55 PEARSON STREET 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N.Y. 11101 

ST-4-9600 




m&si 



SERVING ARTISTS 
for 29 years 



o Color slides 

© Vu - graphs 

° Photo transparencies 

° Photo murals - any size up 
to 52 inch widths 

o Color and B/W prints 



QUALIFIED G.S.A. CONTRACTOR 



526 - 5000 ♦ 526 - 5000 * 526 - 5000 • 526 - 5000 • 526 ■ 5000 * 526 5000 



charts & graphs 




a Id 



accent art, inc. 



7726 Finns Lane 
Lanham, Md. 
20801 
301/459-6390 



illustrations & designs 




composition I lettering 











.'■■•■■.;''■-'•' 




Stephenson, Inc. 
2210 Channing Street NE 
Washington DC 20018 
202/832 0900 



Why not have your 
Typesetting done 
the Modern Way? 



Modern Linotypers 



INCORPORATED 



LINOTYPE LUDLOW 

MONOTYPE HANDSET 

PHOTOSET 



7131 Rutherford Road • Baltimore, Maryland 21207 
501 Fifth Avenue • New York, New York 10017 
Phones — Baltimore (301) 944-6600 • 
Washington (301) 776-7420 



QUALITY 
QUALITY 
QUALITY 
QUALITY 



WORTH REPEATING 



V^UNITED LITHO 



UNITED LITHOGRAPHIC SERVICES. INC 

P.O. Box 191 

Falls Church. Virginia 22046 



560-5700 



Arlington 
Posta craft 

1211 N. Highland St. 
Arlington, Va. 22201 

Phone- 528-0405 



The 
Best 
In Screen 
Printing 



FEDERAL 

DESIGN 

COUNCIL 

RQ BOX 7537 WAS! IINGTON, D.C. 20044 



The Design Response was conceived by 
the Federal Design Council to illustrate 
the unique design solutions developed in 
response to the government's need to 
communicate effectively with the public. 

The Council extends its membership to 
all design and visual communication 
professionals in Federal, State, and local 
governments as well as to those in the 
private sector. If you are interested in 
joining the Federal Design Council, 
complete the form and mail it with a 
membership fee of $20 to: 

Federal Design Council 
P.O. Box 7537 
Washington, D.C. 20044 



Name. 



Home address 

City State Zip 

Phone 



~J Government employee J Private sector 



Agency name 

Agency address 

City State Zip 

Phone 

Status if government: [~J Permanent 
~J Conditional [ J Temporary [~J Military 

Position Responsibilities 



Education 

Professional affiliations 



Color 
Black* White 



Prints 

Transparencies 
Slides 



836- 74 66 
MURRAY PHOTOGRAPHIC BOO N. West St.. Alexandria, Va.